Amur Leopard

The Amur Leopard is solitary. Nimble-footed and strong, it carries and hides unfinished kills so that they are not taken by other predators.
Jun 30, 2017, 5:51 pm ISTAnimalsLoveAnimals Staff
Amur leopards
  Amur leopards

Native to southeastern Russia, the Amur leopard is listed as critically endangered, with fewer than 60 animals left in the wild. Also known as the Far East leopard, the Manchurian leopard or the Korean leopard, it’s been reported that some males stay with females after mating and may even help rear the young. The species is threatened by poaching, habit loss and climate change.

The Amur leopard is solitary. Nimble-footed and strong, it carries and hides unfinished kills so that they are not taken by other predators. It has been reported that some males stay with females after mating, and may even help with rearing the young. Several males sometimes follow and fight over a female. They live for 10-15 years, and in captivity up to 20 years. The Amur leopard is also known as the Far East leopard, the Manchurian leopard or the Korean leopard.

In an amazing tale of recovery, Amur leopard populations have more than doubled in just seven years. New census data reveals Amur leopards in Russia’s Land of the Leopard National Park now number at least 57 cats (up from just 30 cats in 2007). And an additional 8-12 leopards were counted in adjacent areas of China.

 

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